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FEMA Just Got Caught Trying To Hide The Consequences Of Trump’s Puerto Rico Inaction

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Throughout modern history when an authoritarian regime suddenly removed or executed a high profile person, they quickly made all signs, mentions, and references to that person disappear as well.

President Trump may not be as thorough as Nikita Krusheva was when he erased all mentions to his predecessor Joseph Stalin in the early 1950s, even removing the murderous dictator’s preserved body from a crypt where he laid next to Lenin, and changing the name of Stalingrad back to St. Petersburg.

However, Trump has his own version of the “out of sight, out of mind” approach. From the first days of his administration, making the past disappear has been part of the policy of in Trump’s world.

 He didn’t accept the science behind the climate change crisis, so the EPA website no longer had pages of information on the causes and solutions.

Now, after Trump’s much-criticized trip to Puerto Rico, where U.S. recovery efforts have been severely criticized, Trump’s eraser has struck again.

Many of the key measures of how the FEMA and the federal government are helping have been erased from a Homeland Security website, notes The Washington Post.

 On Tuesday, the day Trump spent about five hours in Puerto Rico, you could still read on the Homeland Security website the facts that only five percent of the island had working electrical power and about half the population had access to clean drinking water.

On Wednesday, those stats were gone.

What remained on the FEMA page was that there were now 14,000 federal workers in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, up from 12,300 a few days earlier, and information on which airports were open, how many miles of road had been cleared and what percentage of grocery stores were now open for business.

“Those statistics illustrated President Trump’s assertions that the island is quickly making tremendous strides toward full recovery,” reports the Washington Post, “and that the media have exaggerated the conditions on the ground.”

As Trump’s counselor Kellyanne Conway would put it, the president sometimes has “alternate facts” to share.

What she would not say is that the “alternate facts” appear when Trump finds the real facts uncomfortable or inappropriate to the position he is championing at that moment.

History will decide if Trump really botched the Puerto Rico rescue as it now appears but until then we have to go by what we know. Thanks to Homeland Security, we know a little less, unless we speak Spanish and can read the same stats on the Governor of Puerto Rico’s website.

We are not suggesting Trump is yet in Stalin or even Krushev’s league as an authoritarian dictator, perhaps because American law still restricts him from fulfilling what appears to be his dream – to be obeyed at all times no matter what by always loyal retainers and fans.

However, in terms of the American experience, where our presidents have respected American traditions and institutions, Trump is a disruptor who so far has been more destructive than helpful where ever he has stomped around and given orders.

We are betting history will get it right and it could be Trump’s image that is being erased by some future American leader.

 

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